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What can we do about The Hungry Generation?

One in nine people around the world suffer from chronic undernourishment; hunger. That is around 795 million people including a vast amount of children bringing forth the birth of a hungry generation; the world’s greatest shame.

Hunger is the want or scarcity of food in a country, this causes both the malnutrition and under-nutrition. Such poor nutrition causes nearly 45% of deaths in children under five. That is 3.1 million children each year. What is being done about this?

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As part of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Agenda for the year 2030, goal #2: Zero Hunger targets ending hunger, achieving food security and improved nutrition, and promoting sustainability in agriculture. If you think about, solving the issue of World Hunger should be easy, because there is enough food in the world to feed everyone. So what’s the problem? Well, according to the World Food Program: Knowledge, tools and policies, combined with political will, can solve the problem.

 

In 2014, Latin America’s biggest country was removed from the United Nation’s World Hunger Map. Brazil managed to strategically invest in policies and programs to improve food production and access to health services. There’s a lot to learn from Brazil’s strategies, one in particular is Fome Zero (Zero Hunger), which was introduced by the Brazilian government under President Lula da Silva’s administration in 2003 with the goal to eradicate hunger and extreme poverty in Brazil. And indeed it was successful, despite the criticism on the management of the project, it managed cut stunting (slow development or growth) in Brazilian children in half.  The Zero Hunger Project proposal was a result of the work and research of NGOs, research institutes, grassroots organizations, social movements and more in order to analyze the status of hunger and poverty in the country in order to develop policies.

The aforementioned group found that in order to ensure food security, changes are required in Brazil’s economic development, as factors like unemployment, lack-of-income generating policies, high interest rates and lack of agricultural policies pile into why hunger is increasing in the nation-state. Therefore the Zero Hunger project took action steps as providing food stamps, free meals served in schools, policies towards cheaper food products, supported family farming etc..

fomezero

 

There is enough food in the world to feed and sustain the hungry generation, the question is, how?

It’s not about the challenges that overcome us but rather how we face them. With World Food Day coming up by the end of this week, the questions posed is how can youth contribute to the achievement of Sustainable Development Goal #2: Zero Hunger? How can youth contribute to the development of similar or much enhanced policies as presented in Fome Zero in Brazil?

 

Share your thoughts.

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Why should youth care about the sustainability?

Exactly one year ago, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the set of 17 Sustainable Development Goals. During this time the initiative Youth4GlobalGoals become one of most powerful movements towards the SDGs. The reach has crossed more than 120 countries and territories around the world.

According to the YouthSpeak Survey results, only 46% of young people know about the SDGs. However, they are the ones who will experience the consequences of implementation of the Goals the most. The level of engagement of young people in the Agenda today will directly result in the state of the world in 2030.

While majority (68%) believes the society will be in better state in 2030, young people still ask the question about who is responsible for implementing the SDGs. In reality, youth still relies on the public sector while it’s partnership between public, private sectors and civil society that will be a key to success this time.

Starting from the adoption of the SDGs, the United Nations has created The Lazy Person’s Guide to Save the World, which outlines kinds of small actions that will help to achieve the SDGs. AIESEC believes that each and every young person can play an active role in the Agenda.

Youth 4 Global Goals campaign was created to mobilise young people to take action towards the SDGs. It has a set of initiatives aimed to make people aware about the Global Goals, understand them and act:

  • Youth Speak Survey: the survey got 162,292 answers until today, engaging people across more than 120 countries. The result is the voice of Millennials giving an opinion about what SDGs they would act upon, what kind of motives and fears they have.

  • Youth Speak Forum: an event realized around the world that brings together young and senior leaders to form a space for inspiring conversations and creation of actionable ideas around global issues. In various countries governments and UN agencies have supported the event. The output taken from the Latin American version was presented in PrepCom3 in July that presents youth inputs to new Urban agenda. During the last 6 months event was run in 121 location engaging 23,500 people.

  • Youth Speak Projects: considering the insights got in the Survey, AIESEC is running the social projects around SDGs and Millennials needs. This is how a young person gets an opportunity to directly contribute to an issue he or she relates the most to, while developing the leadership potential.

Organizations like Asian Development Bank, PVBLIC Foundation and UN Habitat were the founding partners of the campaign and many more are joining the movement now.

To learn more about the Youth4GlobalGoals campaign, visit youth4globalgoals.org

Visit the website! Y4GG

Tanya Landysheva

Global Head of Public Relations

AIESEC

tanyal@ai.aiesec.org

Embracing Diversity

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An estimated 100 billion people have been born since the dawn of time. These people

have had different appearances, come from different countries and territories, have

been brought up with different mindsets and have spoken different languages. They

have eaten different food, have had different lifestyles and have belonged to

different generations.

The only sure trait that every single person has had in common is that they were all

unequivocally unique and different.

This is what we call diversity.

 

Embracing Diversity

More and more, we see an emphasis on “accepting and embracing diversity” in both

our professional and personal lives. Socially and politically, there is a huge focus on

eliminating discrimination of any kind and equalizing the treatment of every

individual.

To some, embracing diversity exists only on a surface level. Tolerating and accepting a

different culture, different lifestyle or a different way of thinking is just that –

tolerance. This is by no means negative, but embracing takes much more effort and

much more understanding, and the benefits are much greater as well.

 

Let’s take a deep dive

Every person you have ever walked past, spoken to, befriended or ignored – they have

had a lifetime of experiences that shaped them into who they are today.

Instead of generalising, accepting and tolerating a group of people, assess a person

and interact with them on an individual basis. Ignore the labels that are placed on an

individual (nationality, religion, age, gender) and purely look at the experiences that

have shaped him/her. Understand and appreciate how these different experiences

and upbringings add on to their character.

Put yourself in their shoes and make a connection to their experiences. You don’t

have to love every single difference – just understand and appreciate them.

That is embracing diversity.

 

The Benefits

When we acknowledge these differences, embrace them, and respect them, we can

accomplish what we never thought was possible. We can join ideas together, birthing

from different environments, mindsets and perspectives. We can forge more efficient

teams combining a variety of strengths and experiences. We can be surprised with the

connections we make to a person who is different than us.

Most of all, we appreciate a person so much more after embracing their diversity and

what makes them different – their trials and tribulations. Everyone is different – no

two lives are the same. Sympathize, emphasize and appreciate differences.

 

Putting it into Action

All it takes to be understanding is to start a conversation.

In the next 2 weeks, more than 800 delegates from over 118 countries and territories

will gather in India at AIESEC’s International Congress 2015. We invite you to join us

virtually through our live stream and enjoy conversing with young people from all

over the world.

Join the UN Youth Envoy + AIESEC #YouthNow Contest

Youth opinion is a priority for the United Nations, and we as young leaders  have an incredible opportunity to be a part of this change.

Below is the information you will need to submit your video for the #YouthNow challenge and be a part of the Global Youth Voice.

Join the contest for a chance to have your video formally featured as part of the digital surge leading up to and during the High-Level Event of the General Assembly hosted at the United Nations headquarters in New York City (more about the High Level Event: www.un.org/pga/youth-wpay). The event will be attended by over 1,000 people from around the world, including Ministers and youth leaders! Your video can help inform the online conversation and will be tweeted formally from the UN Youth Envoy account.

What you need to answer in a short video [3 minutes maximum]:
1) What are the most critical issues for youth in 2015?
2) Why is youth development central to the global development agenda?
3) What you think a solution(s) could be?

Post your video on any social media platform using the hashtag #YouthNow. The video can also include your personal action(s) or a project(s) to make a positive change for #YouthNow.

Video checklist

  • Answer all three questions
  • Videos can be made using a camera phone.
  • Videos do not need to be professionally made.
  • Limit is 3 minutes, however your video can be shorter.
  • Videos if shared on Facebook, videos must have security featured set to “public” so we can track them.

All videos must be received by May 26, 2015

What winners get?

  1. A chance to influence a global conversation on youth development! The video will be featured on social media platforms leading up to and during the High-Level Event of the General Assembly at the United Nations headquarters in New York on 29 May 2015.
  2. Video will be featured across UN Youth Envoy and AIESEC websites, including social media channels of the UN and AIESEC.

Winners will be selected based upon

  • Strong message
  • Original and creative
  • Ability to inspire others and are action oriented

What’s the process and reward? A selection committee containing representatives from AIESEC and the Office of the United Nations Envoy on Youth will review all videos and pick the top 3 submissions.

Submit videos by May 26, 2015 on Twitter, Facebook or YouTube with hashtag #YouthNow and submit your video here

Important links:

#YouthNow campaign: www.un.org/pga/youth

High-Level Event of the General Assembly: www.un.org/pga/youth-wpay

AIESEC YouthSpeak movement: youthspeak.aiesec.org

AIESEC and United Nations relationship: here

 

 

AIESEC’s Voice at the United Nations on the Post-2015 Agenda

Here at AIESEC, we are no stranger to the belief that youth have the power to change the world. We are in the business of changing lives and giving young people the opportunity to become ethical leaders—all while moving towards our vision: peace and fulfillment of humankind’s potential.

Earlier in the month, AIESEC took part in the UN ECOSOC Youth Forum, with Karolina Piotrowska, AIESEC International’s VP PR, speaking on behalf of UN Major Group on Children and Youth .

The topic of the forum was: Youth Engagement in the Transition from MDGs to SDGs.

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The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) were established following the Millennium Summit of the UN in 2000, and consist of eight international development goals to achieve by 2015, ranging from eradicating extreme poverty and hunger, to promoting gender equality, to ensuring environmental sustainability.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) refer to the development and proposal of a set of future international development goals beyond 2015. They are to be integrated into the Post-2015 Development Agenda.

The Post-2015 Agenda, then, is a process led by the UN which will aim to help define the future global development framework, in order to review the progress of the MDGs and advance the development agenda beyond 2015.

Of course, these are all very relevant global initiatives to enact change to better the planet. But where do youth come in? Rather, how can young people become involved with such lofty international agendas?

During the Youth Forum, youth leaders came into dialogue with Member States, in order to contribute to policy formulation. They were also given the opportunity to offer their own perspective on specific issues relevant to youth, as well as the broader role of young people in enabling and promoting sustainable development.

The question the forum sought to answer was: how can youth become meaningfully involved in the implementation of the Agenda, though every step of the way? How can we engage youth—that is, the 1.8 billion young people making up a quarter of the earth’s population—in changing and shaping the world into a better place?

UN ECOSOC Youth Forum

Source: UN ECOSOC Website

Start from the Bottom

The grassroots level is “crucially important”. Change happens from the bottom-up, which means it is impossible to ignore the local level because here is exactly where the change detailed in the MDGs/SDGs is supposed to happen. Governments, then, should create opportunities for youth to participate in events that will allow their voice to be heard in decision-making processes. For example, Youth Forums, peer-to-peer training, and capacity building at the grassroots level will empower youth to realize the scope of their potential impact. International knowledge, such as about the SDGs, should also be introduced and embedded into education systems worldwide. There should be no reason for youth to suffer in ignorance of the impact they can be making.

Collaboration on all Fronts

With the SDGs, multi-stakeholder and cross-sector collaboration are also hugely important for implementation. Everyone should come together as a whole to make change happen. This would require a keen knowledge and awareness of differing power dynamics and varying interests of each stakeholder, and being mindful thereof. This would include being aware of cultural differences, of course, but also working with human differences in order to become more influential overall, and together. Furthermore, we should create more opportunities for youth representation and participation by allowing collaboration with youth and including them as stakeholders. For example, reducing formal restrictions on minimum age and setting quotas for companies and governments to employ young people would help achieve this.

Accountability via Transparency

The world today is interconnected a thousand times over via information and communications technology (ICT). The question of the matter now, is how to utilize these channels in a smart, efficient way to engage youth–to raise awareness and education people about the goals. There are various channels of online and offline media that will allow significant reach towards youth, and have the SDGs embedded into their daily lives. However, we also cannot forget the people who do not have the privilege of access to online resources; therefore, offline channels and traditional media should also be used, such as mobile phones and radios, in order to involve community leaders, local organizations, and NGOs.

Awareness & Education

What these all boil down to, is the importance of raising awareness and educating people about these goals. Individuals themselves become very important stakeholders in these global promises once they realize what the SDGs are and what they can do to further the goals. The same rule applies to the private sector; once we have raised awareness and given companies a reason as to why they should be paying attention to cross-sector partnerships and supporting the accomplishment of the SDGs, we will have created a common destination.

Furthermore, awareness is what will also allow the people to hold their governments accountable. By raising awareness, we will increase the visibility of the common vision, and simplify the communication to build partnerships that will facilitate capacity-building. This will then allow all the stakeholders involved to come together and not only implement but accomplish these goals, changing the world for the better.

In summary, the importance of youth engagement is critical at a time where the United Nations will launch a series of goals that will require the youth today to carry on the legacy tomorrow. The answer is clear. Young people need to carry the torch and our current leaders need to ensure that young people are engaged and feel a sense of ownership towards these long-term  initiatives if we are to see success.

For more information on the ECOSOC Youth Forum, check out their website here. You can also find out more about the MDGs here and an overview on the Post-2015 Agenda and the Action 2015 initiative here.

AIESEC Participates at UN ECOSOC Forum on Youth

This generation of young people – the largest the world has ever seen – has a historic opportunity to end poverty, combat climate change, create jobs and fight injustice, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon told a Youth Forum at UN Headquarters in New York this morning as he called on the participants to get involved in shaping a future sustainable development agenda.

Today, there are 1.8 billion young people, representing one quarter of the world’s population. Many struggle to find work, and are often hit hardest in conflict. The Secretary-General says that it is time now to see this huge cohort as a force of change that harbours the ingenuity and creativity to help solve the world’s most daunting challenges.

The event started with a keynote address urging an uptick in investment for children around the world, children’s activist and 2007 International Children’s Peace Prize Winner, Thandiwe Chama, called on delegates to be “on the right side of history” and place “our rights, the rights of children and youth, at the heart of the SDG agenda.”

“There’s no doubt that young people are facing multiple challenges to meet their potential but they are not giving up,” emphasized Youth Envoy Mr. Alhendawi.

“Everywhere I go, I see how the youth want to be connected to the United Nations; they will not miss any opportunity to volunteer and to advocate. They will participate at the Model UN just to simulate what’s happening in the rooms with delegates. Today we are not simulating. This is the United Nations in action.”

As the UN representative on all things relating to young people, Mr. Alhendawi said that a “sense of ownership” is critical to the success of the future sustainable development agenda. The 1.8 billion young people worldwide are ready to “carry their share” of the post-2015 development.

AIESEC representatives Karolina Piotrowska and Tala Mansi are present at the forum to voice our opinions in the role of Youth in light of the upcoming launch of the UN SDG’s.

AIESEC Karolina Piotrowska

Karolina Piotrowska representing the International Coordination Meeting of Youth Organisations

AIESEC United Nations ECOSOC Youth Forum

Tala Mansi from AIESEC speaking about Youth at the forum

Tala Mansi spoke on the panel voicing “the importance of youth development, bridging the gap between employment and education, and creating individual commitment and awareness of SDG’s from the bottom up.”

The engagement of young people is key to ensuring the successes of the SDG’s as young people will be the ones implementing these large global initiatives. AIESEC has engaged tens of thousands of young people in voicing up their opinions via the YouthSpeak survey where it captures their opinions on the challenges they face in reaching their fullest potential.

We further encourage young people to take ownership of the issues they care about and not sit still waiting for change to come. As we firmly believe that the world needs new leaders and our generation are the ones who need to step up, have courage and stand up for what matters to us.

The world needs your leadership and it’s your time to step up and take responsibility. When was the last time you spoke up about issues that mattered to you?

You can learn more about the ECOSOC Youth forum here.

 

 

How Young People Contribute to Changing The World Everyday

Written by Ivana Gusic, Head of Public Relations and Marketing at AIESEC in Austria

This is not a story about current conflicts that are happening in the world. It is not about rockets flying over our skies or ending wars. It is about smaller things. Little things. But the kind of little things that keep a person going forward; that bring the spark into everyday and strengthen the belief that this world is worth fighting for.

In a small town in Hungary named Gyor, 50 young people from AIESEC in Austria attended a conference to plan for the upcoming year and cover numerous topics relevant for the executive bodies gathered there. This conference itself is special because it brings together young people from 6 different countries: Hungary, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Austria, Serbia and Brazil. But that is another story altogether.

AIESEC Conference in Serbia

AIESEC Central European Congress gathering young people from Hungary, Slovakia, Czech Republic and Austria.

The moment that matters happened towards the end of the conference.

I was holding a session — last session of the day about external exposure (since I am Head of PR and Marketing). I was very skeptical of how it would go because everyone was tired from the six-day conference, which was almost over.

There was a part of the session that I completely forgot about; this small task which turned out to be the spark of greatness. I remember I almost skipped it. You never know what is going to be the biggest moment of the day. Usually the moments you believe will be insignificant turn out to be big ones.

The task was to “Discuss in pairs the topics that we, as voice of youth in Austria, could write about; topics that AIESEC is really passionate about; topics that may seem ordinary, but matter.”

After a couple of minutes, it was a moment to share. I thought a couple of people would share and that’s it.

It started with a few remarks and turned into fiery exchange of ideas and opinions.

Forty young people in leadership positions voiced their opinion, passionate about making a change in their hometowns and their country — from educational gap between formal and informal education and skills and experience required to find a job today, to racism in the world and Austria and how to tackle the integration of immigrants for a more peaceful and tolerant world. The issue of aging population and how to empower youth to ensure a sustainable development. Women leadership today in the world and in AIESEC (which is abundant with women in leadership positions).

Internationality and positive aspects of it in today’s globalized world, where conflicts seem to appear like fireworks. Start-ups and the concept of entrepreneurship and innovation as solutions for challenges facing the world today. Tackling social challenges and addressing those that are relevant in a country.

And many more. At least 20 people were actively sharing and feeding of each other’s ideas.

AIESEC Public Speaking

I was standing on the stage, listening to one person after another saying their opinions, listing topics they are passionate about and they would like to write about. I remember I didn’t want the exchange of ideas to stop. I was so overwhelmed by the passion about the issues mentioned and flabbergasted by a wide variety of interests. Forty young minds awake and aware of things that don’t work and willing to do something about it. Have you ever witnessed something like that?

I haven’t before.

I remember that when my enthusiasm and disbelief settled, I was angry — at people saying that youth today is passive; that we don’t care about anything but ourselves. I remember standing in the room with 50 people who paid to come to a six-day conference when they could have gone to the seaside like their friends did. I remember them talking at 7pm in the evening about issues in the world and at home they were passionate about and wanted to solve. And I remember one thought above all others.

That there is greatness in young people. They are aware of the world they live in — technology has made us interconnected and informed. They are passionate and they have an opinion. They are ready to be heard and to contribute to changes if the world will let them.

So how can we empower them? How can we make sure they get a say in what kind of world is being built for them? What kind of world they will live in?

Maybe you’re thinking now that we’re young and that we’ve got a lot to learn yet. And this is true. We don’t know everything. But we have ideas and we are ready to learn. And we’re worth it.

So it should begin today, because 5 to 10 years from now, some of those forty people will have leadership or executive positions. They will have the opportunity to decide which course we take, for better or worse.

Imagine if everyone thought like that. Imagine if everyone cared. Imagine if the world was made up of this type of young people — interested, aware, concerned and willing to participate and change the world for the better. Imagine the world they would be able to build.

And help them — help us build it.

AIESEC Conference

This story was written in contribution to the AIESEC Everyday Leader Series, which showcases stories of everyday leaders who are changing the world. Share your story with the world.

How World Peace Begins With Everyday Leaders

AIESEC World Peace series highlights the stories and lessons from thought and everyday leaders from around the world on how World Peace may just be attainable. Contribute your story.

World Peace.

It has been humanity’s eternal, elusive dream. A dream that has inspired influential leaders like Nelson Mandela, Aung San Suu Kyi, Wangari Maathai, and Malala Yousafzai, to rise from being an ordinary citizen to becoming a leader to make a significant difference. There is also AIESEC’s very own alumnus Martti Ahtisaari, who was the 10th President of Finland and 2008 winner of the Nobel Peace Prize for his “for his efforts on several continents and over more than three decades, to resolve international conflicts.”

Ahtisaari states that AIESEC helped him “discover new passions about diversity and diplomacy.”

Leaders like Ahtisaari are not super heroes, but human beings just like you and I who have strived to achieve extraordinary accomplishments. They are everyday leaderswho care about the world and take action to defend human rights.

Ahtisaari AIESEC

The peaceful freedom fighter Aung San Suu Kyi was once faced at gunpoint, but she did not give in. Instead, she demonstrated absolute courage and clarity by walking without fear to the line of soldiers and with the guns pointed at her, and walked passed it. Nobody was killed.

What would you have done in this moment?

The Lady Gunpoint

In the movie The Lady, Michelle Yeoh portrays Aung San Suu Kyi’s extraordinary life, challenges, road to peace and democracy in Burma, and is a compelling movie that showcases the power of nonviolence. The strength of this iconic woman is outstanding, and is a role model to show that fear cannot conquer our common humanity.We all live our own lives and we often turn down activities by saying “I’m busy.”

Pushing for world peace does not mean we all need to be walking in front of guns, but to take action even in the smallest ways. It is as practical as dedicating even a few hours a month volunteering for a cause that improves the lives of others, and yourself.

Being an everyday leaders means you are actively seeking for ways to improve the well-being of others in your community. An everyday leader can be as simple as:

  • Showing more compassion and empathy to those around you
  • Joining your grandparents for dinner even though you’re busy with work
  • Calling your loved ones to remind them of how thankful you are for their support
  • Volunteering for a social cause because it will make a difference in other peoples lives
  • Leading a peaceful movement of people to actively advocate for positive change in your community

These everyday actions, make a significant difference because you are now actively participating in your community.

Three specific TED Talks that will alter your perspective on the road to peace

 

In the Road to Peace playlist on TED, “these speakers offer inspired ideas, practical advice and real-world examples from around the globe of how it just might be attainable.”

Jody Williams, Nobel Peace Prize Winner in 1997 for her work toward the banning and clearing of anti-personnel mines advocates for society to have a more realistic vision of world peace. The talk focuses on rethinking world peace to human security, and enabling people to live dignified lives.

Scilia Elworthy a three-time Nobel Peace Prize nominee and founder of Oxford Research Group that seeks to develop effective dialogue between nuclear weapons policy-makers worldwide and their critics, talks about how to deal with extreme violence without using force in return. Exploring the themes of how to overcome bullies ranging from countries to individuals without any violence in return

Julia Bacha a filmmaker who produced Budhrus discusses the power of attention, and how we often media and audiences pay attention to the violence, but not the non-violent leaders and peacemakers of the Middle East region that may very well bring peace to the region. Bacha advocates for us to pay attention to nonviolence.

AIESEC Youth Leaders

Progress will come, when all of humanity is awakened, moved to take action and not idly sit by to wait for change.

Young people around the world need to strive to become an everyday leaders and make positive change happen by taking actions that improve the lives of others.

How will you get involved in the global community and create positive change?

Submit and share your everyday leader story with us. Tweet us at @AIESEC or engage with me at @gdondon

 

 

AIESEC at the World Conference on Youth in Sri Lanka

“We are not the leaders of tomorrow, we are the leaders of today”
– Opening remarks by Jayathma Wickramanayake, Sri Lanka’s first Youth Delegate to the UN

Last week Sri Lanka hosted the World Conference on Youth. Over 1,500 young people representing 169 different countries gathered in the capital city of Colombo for this conference which has been held all over the world every few years since 1936. The United Nations is currently in the process of drafting the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the replacement for the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) which expire in 2015. The biggest problem with the MDGs was that there was little to no youth participation, even though youth were the ones who were responsible for carrying them out. The young people at this conference and around the world are determined to make sure their inputs are considered this time around.

The purpose of the conference was to gather youth input from all over the world to produce a joint outcome document between the government representatives in attendance and the global representation of youth, officially called the “Colombo Declaration on Youth.” This document will be taken back to the UN headquarters in New York City to be considered in the negotiations of the SDGs.

Participants came from all over the world and were fully funded by the government of Sri Lanka. Delegates included youth from marginalized backgrounds, youth leaders and experts, Sri Lankan youth delegates, national youth delegates representing 200 nations, and youth from international youth-led organizations—including AIESEC. Cassandra Ruggiero, Global VP of Public Relations for AIESEC International, and myself as the AIESEC Representative to the United Nations, who represented AIESEC at the conference. There were roughly 20 other AIESECers in attendance from Sri Lanka and the rest of the world.

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The biggest testament to the strength of the AIESEC network was that anyone you asked about AIESEC had either participated in a program or definitely knew all about it. Whether or not they were formally a part of our organisation, everyone had the mindset of an AIESECer: determined to make the world a better place through youth leadership.

Cassandra was able to step in for a missing speaker on the Globalization and Youth-led Development panel to share these values with an audience of nearly one hundred people. She was given only 5 minutes to prepare after being asked to speak on the panel, a tribute to the ability of AIESECers to adapt under pressure to any situation. After speaking on the panel, we ran a side event on “Becoming the Leader the World Needs” to help delegates reflect on their leadership journeys so that they can take the excitement of the conference back home and make an impact in their countries.

While many side events focused on presenting information on different thematic areas, AIESEC’s event stuck to a youthful vibe that allowed delegates to learn from their past experiences in leadership and start to figure out what they feel their strengths are. This was just a taste of AIESEC’s leadership development program that runs for each of their members around the world.

“By figuring out how to be the best version of yourself, you can be a better leader for the world, and have more impact in whichever path you choose.”
Cassandra Ruggiero

The Millennium Development Goals have done a lot over the last 14 years to change the world we live in, but take a moment to think about how your leadership can shape the world post-2015. There are many avenues within the United Nations to express your vision for the future, including the MyWorld Survey, but the most important thing for you to do is think about your own community/village/town/city/country/world and figure out how you can make an impact, starting today.

To read more about the outcomes of the World Conference on Youth, head to their blog

Entrepreneurship 101 with Intel

We live in times of a changing, knowledge-based economy. Leaving the industrial age behind, we entered the age of information. Nowadays, job markets require different set of skills; the so-called 21st century skills, such as critical thinking, collaboration, problem solving, team work and many more. The concepts of “intrapreneurship” and “entrepreneurship” have become highly appreciated. But even though the world has changed, education has not followed. There is a huge gap between the knowledge and skills formal education provides and the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in today’s business world.

Intel wants to follow up on the change.

Michał Dżoga, Head of Corporate Affairs (CEE Region) says, “At Intel, we believe that everything we do should matter to society.” That is why at the Europe Youth to Business Forum, Intel ran a workshop with 100 young leaders about the importance of entrepreneurship, start-ups and innovation.

Hard data proves that the entrepreneurship culture in Europe is weaker than anywhere else. This could be associated with the difference in perception the USA and Europe have regarding the outlook on failure when starting your own company. In the USA, failure is accepted as part of the natural process of learning and growing. Most of what you learn as an entrepreneur is by trial and error. In Europe however, people tend to be too cautious in their desire not to fail, which prevents them from taking healthy risks necessary for the success of their company.

Michał Dżoga asked the delegates at the workshop a powerful question – How often do students start a company straight after college and succeed without previous experience?

It happens all the time!

When starting up, it is important to remember that you don’t have to have absolutely everything in the beginning, because that’s very hard to achieve. The idea is to start and constantly add to what you have. As Michał said “There are more interesting ideas than good companies on the market.“

Another tip to keep in mind about entrepreneurship is that idea is small part of the investment; implementation is everything. In a science project, an idea is worth a lot. But since globalisation influences start-ups, someone else may be doing your project already. That’s why it is important to start as early as possible, with good mentoring and guidance.

At Europe Y2B Forum, Michał Dżoga also revealed the secret of Intel’s success “We really believe in what we are doing. People who were there in the beginning are still with the company. What Intel is most proud of is Moore’s law, named after its co-founder Gordon Moore, which states that the number of transistors on a chip will double approximately every two years. The company uses this as a guiding principle for growth and advancement. Intel has the legacy to foster innovation and leadership, which are embedded in the DNA of the company.“

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As part of this legacy, Intel is organising the Intel Business Challenge, an event which brings together the best engineers and scientists from around the world to present how they plan to make the world a better place through innovations and entrepreneurial skills! But the Intel Business Challenge is not only about the competition, but more about the platform that will help you fine tune your idea and gain mentorship and guidance from entrepreneurs all over the world.

Find out more at intelchallenge.eu. Apply, become an entrepreneur and make the world a better place!